News

10 July 2014
As climate change shifts the geographic ranges in which animals can be found, concern mounts over the effect it has on their parasites. Does an increased range for a host mean new territory for its parasites as well? Not necessarily, says a team of UC Santa Barbara scientists, including...
1 July 2014
Douglas McCauley, a new assistant professor in UC Santa Barbara’s Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, does fieldwork in one of the most isolated places in the world — Palmyra Atoll. About halfway between Hawaii and American Samoa, this complex of small islands and inlets in the...
24 June 2014
The first regional assessment by the Ocean Health Index on American waters — Southern, Central and Northern California, Oregon and Washington — showed that habitat destruction, particularly the loss of salt marshes and sand dunes, over the last several decades negatively impacted carbon storage and...
24 June 2014
Twenty-three middle- and high-school science teachers took advantage of the lull of summer break — not to mention the weather — to hang out at UC Santa Barbara’s Campus Point last week. Armed with hand tools, they dug into the sand, exploring for crabs or examining limpets that clung to the rocks....
1 April 2014
How can protecting nature help secure future food, energy and water supplies for 10 billion people, particularly for the planet’s poorest and most marginalized citizens? Science for Nature and People (SNAP) — a scientific collaboration among UC Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological...
17 March 2014
With small labs, field stations and individual researchers collectively producing the majority of scientific data, the task of storing, sharing and finding the millions of smaller datasets requires a widely available, flexible and robust long-term data management solution. This is especially true...
4 March 2014
As ice cover in the Arctic Ocean diminishes, the anticipation of increased shipping activity grows. In response, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) is developing an international code of safety for ships operating in polar waters, commonly known as the Polar Code. To further the Polar...
26 February 2014
Invertebrates make up more than 70 percent of the approximately 1.9 million described species on Earth. These creatures have long served as model organisms in many areas of biology. Sea urchins, for example, are used in developmental/cancer cell biology, mollusks for neurobiology research, fruit...
14 February 2014
The rapid conversion of natural lands to cement-dominated urban centers is causing great losses in biodiversity. Yet, according to a new study involving 147 cities worldwide, surprisingly high numbers of plant and animal species persist and even flourish in urban environments — to the tune of...
11 February 2014
As climate change unfolds over the next century, plants and animals will need to adapt or shift locations to follow their ideal climate. A new study provides an innovative global map of where species are likely to succeed or fail in keeping up with a changing climate. The findings appear in the...

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